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Volume 85 Issue 47 | pp. 15-20
Issue Date: November 19, 2007

Cover Story

Suits and Lab Coats

Industry draws on academic know-how to help develop specialty chemicals and other new materials
Department: Government & Policy, Education | Collection: Sustainability
Credit: Harvard University/Liang-Yin Chu/Weitz Lab Group
Credit: Harvard University/Liang-Yin Chu/Weitz Lab Group
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Captivating research
Multiple emulsions formed with microfluidic devices can be used to create drops within drops for ingredient encapsulation and controlled release.
Credit: Harvard University/Liang-Yin Chu/Weitz Lab Group
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Captivating research
Multiple emulsions formed with microfluidic devices can be used to create drops within drops for ingredient encapsulation and controlled release.
Credit: Harvard University/Liang-Yin Chu/Weitz Lab Group
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Dressed to kill
NanoJackets, developed at Penn State, can carry cancer-killing drugs.
Credit: Keystone Nano
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Dressed to kill
NanoJackets, developed at Penn State, can carry cancer-killing drugs.
Credit: Keystone Nano
Boomerangs
Templates for precisely controlled drug-carrying nanoparticles were developed as part of a University of North Carolina grad student's doctoral dissertation.
Credit: Liquidia
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Boomerangs
Templates for precisely controlled drug-carrying nanoparticles were developed as part of a University of North Carolina grad student's doctoral dissertation.
Credit: Liquidia
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Captivating clusters
Scanning electron microscope image of a colloidosome that can encapsulate many different materials. Permeability of the shell of solid particles can be controlled for ingredient delivery by adjusting the size of the interstices between spherical particles on the surface. The diameter of each sphere is less then 1 µm.
Credit: David Weitz
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Captivating clusters
Scanning electron microscope image of a colloidosome that can encapsulate many different materials. Permeability of the shell of solid particles can be controlled for ingredient delivery by adjusting the size of the interstices between spherical particles on the surface. The diameter of each sphere is less then 1 µm.
Credit: David Weitz
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Microgel Master
Scanning electron microscope images of colloidosomes formed with the help of thermoresponsive microgel cores as templates. When the cores are cooled, they shrink, forcing the colloidal particles to buckle and jam together into a robust coating.
Credit: David Weitz
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Microgel Master
Scanning electron microscope images of colloidosomes formed with the help of thermoresponsive microgel cores as templates. When the cores are cooled, they shrink, forcing the colloidal particles to buckle and jam together into a robust coating.
Credit: David Weitz
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Up close and personal
Providing a somewhat planetary appearance, this confocal microscope image reveals the surface of an emulsion drop covered with colloidal particles. This is a precursor to the formation of a colloidosome.
Credit: David Weitz
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Up close and personal
Providing a somewhat planetary appearance, this confocal microscope image reveals the surface of an emulsion drop covered with colloidal particles. This is a precursor to the formation of a colloidosome.
Credit: David Weitz
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Drop Engineering
When flowed through a microfluidic device like the branched one shown here, large droplets (top) break successively into ever smaller and more uniform droplets. The droplets' monodispersity shows up clearly in the image on the right.
Credit: David Weitz
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Drop Engineering
When flowed through a microfluidic device like the branched one shown here, large droplets (top) break successively into ever smaller and more uniform droplets. The droplets' monodispersity shows up clearly in the image on the right.
Credit: David Weitz
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Crystallized
Binary-alloy colloidal crystal consisting of particles of two different sizes, crystallized into an AB6 structure, as viewed by confocal microscopy (left and center) and in a computer rendering (right).
Credit: David Weitz
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Crystallized
Binary-alloy colloidal crystal consisting of particles of two different sizes, crystallized into an AB6 structure, as viewed by confocal microscopy (left and center) and in a computer rendering (right).
Credit: David Weitz
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Ah, Nuts!
Liquidia can control nanoparticle size, shape, and chemical composition to enable design of, for instance, hex-nut-shaped inhalable therapeutic agents. The technology making this possible was developed at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Credit: Liquidia
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Ah, Nuts!
Liquidia can control nanoparticle size, shape, and chemical composition to enable design of, for instance, hex-nut-shaped inhalable therapeutic agents. The technology making this possible was developed at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Credit: Liquidia
Hot Flashes
Suspended in the vials are fluorescent imaging agents imbedded in nanocomposite materials.
Credit: Keystone Nano
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Hot Flashes
Suspended in the vials are fluorescent imaging agents imbedded in nanocomposite materials.
Credit: Keystone Nano
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Chemical companies, such as BASF, are forging new relationships with academic partners to further research with technological and commercial promise. Some of the research support that BASF will be funneling into Harvard University in the coming years could help move some fundamental work in those more practical directions. Examples from the lab of David A. Weitz, a professor of physics and applied physics, are illustrated in the images here. In other cases, universities are aiding commercialization of fundamental research and helping along start-up firms such as Liquidia Technologies, whose nanoparticle replication technology is also shown here.

Photo Gallery

Chemical companies, such as BASF, are forging new relationships with academic partners to further research with technological and commercial promise. Some of the research support that BASF will be funneling into Harvard University in the coming years could help move some fundamental work in those more practical directions. Examples from the lab of David A. Weitz, a professor of physics and applied physics, are illustrated in the images here. In other cases, universities are aiding commercialization of fundamental research and helping along start-up firms such as Liquidia Technologies, whose nanoparticle replication technology is also shown here.

 
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