Volume 89 Issue 44 | pp. 49-51
Issue Date: October 31, 2011 | Web Date: October 30, 2011

Beauty At The Lab Bench

C&EN’s 2011 photo contest draws gorgeous images from its readers
Department: Science & Technology
Keywords: photography, microscopy, images, graphics, figures, art
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FIRST PLACE
Scientists are using electron microscopy to understand the reaction of carbon dioxide and minerals for the deep underground storage of the greenhouse gas. This colorized photo shows the growth of the mineral dypingite (golden fl orets) by the reaction of supercritical carbon dioxide in water (not shown) and the mineral olivine forsterite (green and purple). The stalk is about 15 µm long and the fl oret is about 5 µm long. It was colored by graphic designer Nathan Johnson. Bruce Arey, Andy Felmy, Odeta Qafoku, and Zheming Wang provided the image. (The blue is a carbon tape on which the particles of forsterite sit.)
Credit: Bruce Arey/Pacific Northwest National Lab
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FIRST PLACE
Scientists are using electron microscopy to understand the reaction of carbon dioxide and minerals for the deep underground storage of the greenhouse gas. This colorized photo shows the growth of the mineral dypingite (golden fl orets) by the reaction of supercritical carbon dioxide in water (not shown) and the mineral olivine forsterite (green and purple). The stalk is about 15 µm long and the fl oret is about 5 µm long. It was colored by graphic designer Nathan Johnson. Bruce Arey, Andy Felmy, Odeta Qafoku, and Zheming Wang provided the image. (The blue is a carbon tape on which the particles of forsterite sit.)
Credit: Bruce Arey/Pacific Northwest National Lab

In its second annual photo contest, C&EN asked scientists to send in photos of beautiful things that showed up on their lab benches. They submitted stunning images of crystals, snapshots of chromatography chambers, colorized electron microscope images, and much more. Winners were selected based solely on the strength of the image. Shown here are the top-rated contributions.

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SECOND PLACE
This photo shows a black pigment mixing into a white, water-based adhesive. Chemists at L.D. Davis Industries stopped the agitation for a moment to capture this remarkable pattern. The average width of the patches of black pigment is approximately 5 mm.
Credit: Gred Brown/L.D. Davis Industries
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SECOND PLACE
This photo shows a black pigment mixing into a white, water-based adhesive. Chemists at L.D. Davis Industries stopped the agitation for a moment to capture this remarkable pattern. The average width of the patches of black pigment is approximately 5 mm.
Credit: Gred Brown/L.D. Davis Industries
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THIRD PLACE
This scanning electron microscope image shows a corallike polymer structure that formed when a polyhydroxyalkanoate polymer sca old for growing calcium phosphate crystals unexpectedly crystallized with itself. Before imaging, the polymer structures were transferred onto carboncoated copper grids and sputtered with silver.
Credit: Agnisezka Jagoda/U of Basel
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THIRD PLACE
This scanning electron microscope image shows a corallike polymer structure that formed when a polyhydroxyalkanoate polymer sca old for growing calcium phosphate crystals unexpectedly crystallized with itself. Before imaging, the polymer structures were transferred onto carboncoated copper grids and sputtered with silver.
Credit: Agnisezka Jagoda/U of Basel
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
Vials containing polar fractions from the mushroom Inonotus dryadeus cast dramatic shadows. Researchers from Italy and Slovenia created the fractions to study the anticlotting and antioxidant effects of natural products from the fungus.
Credit: Tiziano Altier/U of Trieste
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
Vials containing polar fractions from the mushroom Inonotus dryadeus cast dramatic shadows. Researchers from Italy and Slovenia created the fractions to study the anticlotting and antioxidant effects of natural products from the fungus.
Credit: Tiziano Altier/U of Trieste
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
In a fermenter used for biofuel research, air flow and an impeller synergize to bring out the simple beauty of mixing. The combination of the air flow from the sparger and impeller assembly spinning at the same time caused the beautiful effect, says Gureet Chandhok, who took the photo.
Credit: Gureet Chandhok/U of Western Ontario
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
In a fermenter used for biofuel research, air flow and an impeller synergize to bring out the simple beauty of mixing. The combination of the air flow from the sparger and impeller assembly spinning at the same time caused the beautiful effect, says Gureet Chandhok, who took the photo.
Credit: Gureet Chandhok/U of Western Ontario
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
This light microscope image shows the porous silica surface of a living diatom cell from the organism Coscinodiscus wailesii. The diatom cell is covered in hexagonal-shaped pores, about 1 µm in diameter. Researchers at Oregon State University have used these microbes in biosensors, solar cells, and electroluminescent devices. “Diatoms are really beautiful, but they are also becoming relevant players in nanobiotechnology,” says Debra Gale, who submitted the photo.
Credit: Debra Gale/Oregon State U
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
This light microscope image shows the porous silica surface of a living diatom cell from the organism Coscinodiscus wailesii. The diatom cell is covered in hexagonal-shaped pores, about 1 µm in diameter. Researchers at Oregon State University have used these microbes in biosensors, solar cells, and electroluminescent devices. “Diatoms are really beautiful, but they are also becoming relevant players in nanobiotechnology,” says Debra Gale, who submitted the photo.
Credit: Debra Gale/Oregon State U
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
Sparks fly off of a copper plate that has been coated with a high-voltage insulating material during a test of its dielectric breakdown strength. The insulating material is a polyester varnish that is used to protect high-horsepower motors.
Credit: Randy Robin/Elantas Pdg
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
Sparks fly off of a copper plate that has been coated with a high-voltage insulating material during a test of its dielectric breakdown strength. The insulating material is a polyester varnish that is used to protect high-horsepower motors.
Credit: Randy Robin/Elantas Pdg
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
In this close-up of a fermenter used in a biofuel research lab, water is being agitated and aerated simultaneously. The use of a camera with fast shutter speed freezes the bubbles and allows the viewer to see how they twirl and rise at the same time. “Sometimes waiting in the lab for some reactions can be a pain, but you will always find something to do,” says Luis C. Luque-Moreno, who took the photo.
Credit: LUIS C. LUQUE-MORENO/U OF WESTERN ONTARIO
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
In this close-up of a fermenter used in a biofuel research lab, water is being agitated and aerated simultaneously. The use of a camera with fast shutter speed freezes the bubbles and allows the viewer to see how they twirl and rise at the same time. “Sometimes waiting in the lab for some reactions can be a pain, but you will always find something to do,” says Luis C. Luque-Moreno, who took the photo.
Credit: LUIS C. LUQUE-MORENO/U OF WESTERN ONTARIO
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
The view from above as enamel electrical insulation materials are poured into a dish. Each of the three polymer solutions has been mixed with a different dye. All of them are polyesters that can be coated onto high-horsepower motors and then cured into a solid film.
Credit: RANDY ROBINSON/ELANTAS PDG
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
The view from above as enamel electrical insulation materials are poured into a dish. Each of the three polymer solutions has been mixed with a different dye. All of them are polyesters that can be coated onto high-horsepower motors and then cured into a solid film.
Credit: RANDY ROBINSON/ELANTAS PDG
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are used for highly sensitive cellular imaging to understand cellular processes and the causes of pathogenic diseases. The largest dot (red) is about 250 µm in diameter and surrounded by cellulose strands (yellow) used in synthesis. The as-yet-unexplained dimple is probably a by-product of synthesis. Dev Chatterjee provided the image and graphic designer Jeff London colored it. Others on the project are Matthew Edwards, Paul MacFarlan, Samuel Bryan, and Jason Hoki.
Credit: DEV CHATTERJEE/PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LAB
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are used for highly sensitive cellular imaging to understand cellular processes and the causes of pathogenic diseases. The largest dot (red) is about 250 µm in diameter and surrounded by cellulose strands (yellow) used in synthesis. The as-yet-unexplained dimple is probably a by-product of synthesis. Dev Chatterjee provided the image and graphic designer Jeff London colored it. Others on the project are Matthew Edwards, Paul MacFarlan, Samuel Bryan, and Jason Hoki.
Credit: DEV CHATTERJEE/PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LAB
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
While working on bioinspired antifouling surfaces at Virginia Tech, Mehdi Kargar observed spherical bacteria that had accumulated on polystyrene nanofibers in the shape of a flower. The leaves are nanofibers that were pushed aside by the energy of the microscope’s electron beam.
Credit: MEHDI KARGAR/VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INST. & STATE U
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HONORABLE MENTIONS
While working on bioinspired antifouling surfaces at Virginia Tech, Mehdi Kargar observed spherical bacteria that had accumulated on polystyrene nanofibers in the shape of a flower. The leaves are nanofibers that were pushed aside by the energy of the microscope’s electron beam.
Credit: MEHDI KARGAR/VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INST. & STATE U
 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © American Chemical Society
Comments
Anne T. O'Brien (Tue Nov 01 18:04:35 EDT 2011)
I can see only one image, and clicking the arrow to see others yields zero results -- I know you'll fix it!
Rachel Pepling (Wed Nov 02 08:11:37 EDT 2011)
Anne, which browser are you using? Does clicking on the image itself (not the play icon) bring up the slideshow? We'll definitely fix it!
Robert Buntrock (Wed Nov 02 15:16:23 EDT 2011)
Clicking on the iamge brings up the slides but the labels are superimposed on the images and difficult or impossible to read, especially those on a dark background.
Alton Banks (Tue Nov 15 13:36:11 EST 2011)
I would echo the comments about the play icon NOT bringing up the slideshow.
I'm using a Firefox browser.
Love the pictures, but the legends are difficult to read when super'd over the images.
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