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Volume 90 Issue 52 | p. 20
Issue Date: December 24, 2012

Cover Stories: Research Year In Review

Laser Tools Advance Chemical Analysis

New technologies achieve near-atomic-resolution crystal structures and blindingly fast spectroscopic measurements
Department: Science & Technology
Keywords: laser, serial femtosecond crystallography, free-electron laser, tabletop laser, chemical year in review
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High-pressure helium gas in this waveguide “upconverts” infrared laser light to an ultrafast laserlike UV/X-ray beam.
Credit: Tenio Popmintchev, JILA-U. Colorado
A photo of an open cylindrical device mounted to a laser tube. Water lines run through one end, and a beam of light shoots across a gap between two components in the device.
 
High-pressure helium gas in this waveguide “upconverts” infrared laser light to an ultrafast laserlike UV/X-ray beam.
Credit: Tenio Popmintchev, JILA-U. Colorado
[+]Enlarge
This coherent X-ray imaging instrument at SLAC generates femtosecond high-energy X-ray pulses used for SFX analysis of biomolecules.
Credit: SLAC
A large lab with a host of complicated-looking apparatuses. On the left, a mottled silver tube with ports and cables coming out of it rests on a red mount, roughly waist-high.
 
This coherent X-ray imaging instrument at SLAC generates femtosecond high-energy X-ray pulses used for SFX analysis of biomolecules.
Credit: SLAC
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Audrius Pugzlys of Vienna Institute of Technology runs a custom IR laser that drives the new X-ray source.
Credit: Vienna University of Technology
A man in shirtsleeves and tinted safety goggles works at a laser table. A box directly in front of him emanates bright white light from its open top.
 
Audrius Pugzlys of Vienna Institute of Technology runs a custom IR laser that drives the new X-ray source.
Credit: Vienna University of Technology

This year, laser technology gave chemists the ability to determine protein structures at near-atomic resolution from even the tiniest of crystals and to study the fastest chemical processes on a tabletop without the need for synchrotron radiation. Sébastien Boutet of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and coworkers demonstrated that serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) enables biomolecular structure determinations with near-atomic resolution. SFX uses free-electron lasers to analyze microcrystals that are too small for conventional X-ray crystallography. The technique was previously capable of about 8-Å resolution. This is considered far above the threshold of atomic resolution, which starts at about 3 Å. But the advent of higher power free-electron laser X-rays made it possible for Boutet and coworkers to obtain a 1.9-Å SFX structure of a lysozyme (C&EN, June 4, page 8; Science, DOI: 10.1126/science.1217737). Some researchers believe that SFX with even more powerful X-rays could make it possible to analyze biomolecules without having to crystallize them at all. In that case, movies of molecular interactions might be possible. This year, scientists also developed the first tabletop laser X-ray system, enabling scientists to spectroscopically track blindingly fast chemical processes without using synchrotron radiation. The system was devised by an international team including Tenio Popmintchev, Margaret M. Murnane, and Henry C. Kapteyn of JILA, a physical science institute at the University of Colorado (C&EN, June 11, page 5; Science, DOI: 10.1126/science.1218497). The light source is a “supercontinuum” beam of ultraviolet-through-soft-X-ray radiation with bursts as fast as 2.5 attoseconds (10–18 seconds). Strictly speaking, it’s “laserlike” and not a laser per se because the X-ray beam is not produced by direct lasing. The beam can be used as a broadband or monochromatic source of wavelengths as short as 7.7 Å. The researchers believe the device’s capabilities might eventually be extended to harder X-rays and faster pulses, perhaps in the zeptosecond (10–21) range.

 
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