• CORRECTION: This story was updated on Sept. 15, 2014, to correct a sentence stating that studies of sediment cores from Lake Pepin, Minn., show triclosan first appearing in the 1950s. Triclosan appeared in the 1960s.
19
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Volume 92 Issue 25 | pp. 10-13
Issue Date: June 23, 2014

Cover Story

Triclosan Under The Microscope

Concerns about safety and efficacy dog compound used in antibacterial consumer products
Department: Science & Technology
Keywords: triclosan, antibacterial, antimicrobial, biocide, antibiotic resistance

If you’ve ever used a product labeled as antibacterial, chances are you’ve encountered triclosan. Patented in the 1960s as an antimicrobial agent and first used in health care settings, triclosan became ubiquitous in the U.S. as consumers became increasingly germophobic. Companies added triclosan to soaps, bodywashes, deodorants, toothpaste, shaving gel, and cosmetics, as well as products such as dishwashing liquids, laundry detergents, cutting boards, toys, fabrics, shoes, and caulking compounds.

Triclosan . . .

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Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © American Chemical Society
Triclosan Under The Microscope | June 23, 2014 Issue - Vol. 92 Issue 25 | Chemical & Engineering News
 
 
  • CORRECTION: This story was updated on Sept. 15, 2014, to correct a sentence stating that studies of sediment cores from Lake Pepin, Minn., show triclosan first appearing in the 1950s. Triclosan appeared in the 1960s.
19
Facebook
Volume 92 Issue 25 | pp. 10-13
Issue Date: June 23, 2014

Cover Story

Triclosan Under The Microscope

Concerns about safety and efficacy dog compound used in antibacterial consumer products
Department: Science & Technology
Keywords: triclosan, antibacterial, antimicrobial, biocide, antibiotic resistance

If you’ve ever used a product labeled as antibacterial, chances are you’ve encountered triclosan. Patented in the 1960s as an antimicrobial agent and first used in health care settings, triclosan became ubiquitous in the U.S. as consumers became increasingly germophobic. Companies added triclosan to soaps, bodywashes, deodorants, toothpaste, shaving gel, and cosmetics, as well as products such as dishwashing liquids, laundry detergents, cutting boards, toys, fabrics, shoes, and caulking compounds.

Triclosan . . .

To view the rest of this content, please log in with your ACS ID.



 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © American Chemical Society