Antifreeze Protein Works From Inside Out | February 17, 2014 Issue - Vol. 92 Issue 7 | Chemical & Engineering News
Volume 92 Issue 7 | p. 7 | News of The Week
Issue Date: February 17, 2014

Antifreeze Protein Works From Inside Out

Biochemistry: Surprising fish structure includes large water sheets
Department: Science & Technology
News Channels: Biological SCENE
Keywords: antifreeze, protein, fish

To survive wintry weather, organisms such as fish, insects, and plants have developed antifreeze proteins that inhibit growth of ice crystals in their tissues. Studying one such protein called Maxi from winter flounder, researchers in Canada have discovered that the protein has an unexpected structure. Unlike similar antifreeze proteins—and unlike other proteins, generally—Maxi incorporates sheets of hundreds of water molecules into its core (Science 2014, DOI: "; $("#ERA_RC").html(contextualDefault); } }); var era_rc1 = {StyleId: '1',ERADomain: ''};


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