Volume 93 Issue 37 | p. 32
Issue Date: September 21, 2015

Periodic Graphics: The Chemistry Of Writing Inks

Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning explains the blend of chemicals used by pens to leave their indelible marks.
By Andy Brunning
Department: Science & Technology
News Channels: Materials SCENE, Organic SCENE
Keywords: ink, solvent, pigment, dye, ballpoint pen, ethylene glycol, crystal violet, eosin
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To download a pdf of this article, visit http://cenm.ag/writinginks.
Credit: Andy Brunning/Compound Interest
Graphic showing components of ink with explanations of their functions.
 
To download a pdf of this article, visit http://cenm.ag/writinginks.
Credit: Andy Brunning/Compound Interest

A collaboration between C&EN and Andy Brunning, chemistry educator and author of the popular graphics blog Compound Interest. To see more of Brunning’s work, go to compoundchem.com. Check out all of C&EN’s Periodic Graphics here.

 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © American Chemical Society
Comments
nobu (Thu Oct 15 21:40:09 EDT 2015)
The structure of Eosin Y given here corresponds to the un-colored lactone form. To produce red color, the lactone ring should be cleaved to have large pi-conjugation throughout the molecule and also one of the phenol groups should be dissociated. Am I right?
mohamed (Thu Sep 29 13:43:25 EDT 2016)
How can you colour batumain (asphalt)?
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