Volume 94 Issue 15 | p. 6 | News of The Week
Issue Date: April 11, 2016 | Web Date: April 7, 2016

Toxic biocides may not be needed routinely at fracking sites, study shows

Tests find that some fracking sites don’t contain pipeline-fouling microbes
Department: Science & Technology
News Channels: Analytical SCENE, Biological SCENE, Environmental SCENE
Keywords: fracking, biocides, Bakken, glutaraldehyde, hydrogen sulfide

When oil and gas companies extract fuel from the earth via fracking, they routinely add biocides such as glutaraldehyde to the high-pressure water they use to fracture rock formations deep underground. These compounds are a preemptive strike against microbes that produce hydrogen sulfide, which can corrode pipelines.

New research, however, calls into question the across-the-board addition of toxic biocides to water used in fracking. Jason Gaspar and . . .

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