January 16, 2006 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
 
 
Copyright © 2006 American Chemical Society
 

January 16, 2006 Issue

Volume 84, Issue 3
Chemglassicon
January 16, 2006 Issue, Vol. 84 | Iss. 3
Despite the declining use of glass, glassblowers remain vital to science and medicine
By Rachel Petkewich
(pp. 9-15)
Features
Science & Technology
Architecture of RNAi enzyme suggests it measures and then snips its substrates (p.4)
Government & Policy
Higher energy prices are making technologies to gasify the nation's vast coal reserves attractive again (pp. 22-24)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

Dicer Yields Its Structural Secrets

Architecture of RNAi enzyme suggests it measures and then snips its substrates
(p.4)

Assessing Risk

White House proposes government-wide benchmarks to evaluate numerous risks
(p.6)

Givaudan And IFF Plan To Revamp

Moves may be coincidental rather than emblematic of a struggling industry
(p.6)

Chemists Forge New Bonds In India

Meeting brings U.S. and Indian scientists together to share ideas and build networks
(p.7)

New Fulbright

Award for foreign science students is part of State Department effort to promote U.S. education
(p.7)

Clot Plot Thickens

A phosphate polymer emerges as an unsung player in blood chemistry
(p.8)

Ladder Polyethers In A Snap

Directing group governs regioselective epoxide opening, then is jettisoned
(p.8)
 

Departments

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Government & Policy

Higher energy prices are making technologies to gasify the nation's vast coal reserves attractive again
(pp. 22-24)
Stem cell research community is shocked by findings that landmark work by South Korean was a con
(p.25)

Education

Simulations and online tutorials to augment traditional learning are slowly being put to use
(pp. 31-32)