March 13, 2006 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
 
 
Copyright © 2006 American Chemical Society
 

March 13, 2006 Issue

Volume 84, Issue 11
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March 13, 2006 Issue, Vol. 84 | Iss. 11
NSF director shares excitement for foundation's future, enthusiasm for ongoing research, and insights into science and technology policy issues
By Susan R. Morrissey
(pp. 15-19)
Features
Science & Technology
Biosynthetic route may open up access to analogs of potent antibiotic (p.9)
Business
Custom chemical manufacturers showed renewed faith in their industry at this year's Informex (pp. 24-26)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

Nisin Engineered In Test Tube

Biosynthetic route may open up access to analogs of potent antibiotic
(p.9)

Linde To Acquire Rival BOC

German firm raises bid for the British industrial gas firm and expects acceptance
(p.10)

Nitrous Acid From Sun And Soil

Important atmospheric molecule may be generated by light and humic acid
(p.11)

German Results Up

Sales rise at 'Big Three' chemical firms, but Bayer's profits fall on agchem slump
(p.12)

When One Plus One Equals New

Study sheds light on how mammals sense mixtures of odorants
(p.12)

Macromolecules Self-Destruct

Adsorption induces carbon-carbon bonds in brushlike macromolecules to break
(p.13)

NIH Public Access Policy Is Having Little Impact

Survey looks at how well NIH-funded authors understand agency policy
(p.13)
 

Departments

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Government & Policy

Bills in House differ on how U.S. should regulate persistent organic pollutants pegged for global controls
(pp. 31-32)
NSF director shares excitement for foundation's future, enthusiasm for ongoing research, and insights into science and technology policy issues
(pp. 15-19)
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Science & Technology

Technology and Business News for the Laboratory World
(p.39)
Lubricant keeps car engines from clanging apart, sparks debates on how often it should be changed
(p.38)
Architectures of fungal and mammalian fatty acid synthases are determined at 5-Å resolution
(pp. 34-35)
Electrostatic interactions bring together oppositely charged nanoparticles in an unexpected way
(p.36)
Small molecules is used to partially restore lost activity of a disabled enzyme
(p.37)

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