May 14, 2012 Issue | Chemical & Engineering News
 
 

What Is Tinsel Made Of? Speaking of Chemistry Ep. 12

How is the shiny tinsel that decorates many Christmas trees made? Find out all about tinsel's chemistry history in this very special holiday episode of Speaking of Chemistry.

 
Copyright © 2012 American Chemical Society
 

May 14, 2012 Issue

Volume 90, Issue 20
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May 14, 2012 Issue, Vol. 90 | Iss. 20
Ingredient makers ramp up research in encapsulation and delivery systems
By Marc S. Reisch
(pp. 13-18)
Features
Business
Sales and profits climb once again but capitalization wanes (pp. 22-25)
Science & Technology
Austrian Alps provide a proxy for martian caves that could hold life (pp. 40-41)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

Agent Boosts Cancer Cells’ Vulnerability

Drug Discovery: Researchers use the power of multivalency to design a better cancer trap
(p.7)

Federal Rules For Fracking

Regulation: Interior Department proposes disclosure rules for hydraulic fracturing chemicals
(p.8)

Modeling Nanotube Reactions

Theoretical Chemistry: Approach predicts outcome of nanotube functionalization
(p.8)

Explosion In Thailand Kills 12

Chemical Safety: Accidents reignite simmering tensions
(p.9)

Evans Wins Welch Award

Awards: Harvard chemist’s contributions to asymmetric synthesis recognized with 2012 prize
(p.10)

Zeolites Don’t Mind Hot Water

Catalysis: Organosilyl groups stabilize workhorse catalysts for aqueous-phase reactions
(p.10)

Japanese Firms Struggle To Profit

Annual Results: Earthquake and weak global economy take a toll
(p.11)

Paying For Power Plant Shutdowns

Nuclear Energy: Funds to pay for decommissioning of reactors may run short, GAO warns
(p.11)
 

Departments

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Government & Policy

Financial woes raise questions about federal R&D funding
(pp. 34-35)
Chemist-turned-politician ran low-budget gubernatorial campaign
(p.36)
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Science & Technology

Austrian Alps provide a proxy for martian caves that could hold life
(pp. 40-41)
After 20-plus years of outcast status, unconventional heat-producing nuclear reactions still seem plausible
(pp. 42-44)

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