Copyright © 2016 American Chemical Society
 

August 8, 2016 Issue

Volume 94, Issue 32
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August 8, 2016 Issue, Vol. 94 | Iss. 32
With the ability to probe a wide range of materials, researchers, from paleontologists to catalyst chemists, flock to these powerful light sources
By Mitch Jacoby
(pp. 28-33)
Features
Government & Policy
EPA looks to incorporate metabolism into high throughput chemical screening (pp. 16-19)
Science & Technology
Officials can now check for long-ago anabolic steroid use, with gene doping tests on the horizon (pp. 25-26)
Back Issues
 

News of the Week

China tops 48th International Chemistry Olympiad

U.S. earns a gold, two silvers, and a bronze medal at the annual high school chemistry competition
(p.5)

Natural product helps obese mice lose weight

Molecule increases sensitivity to hormone that regulates hunger and energy metabolism
(p.6)

New battery packs more storage capacity than standard Li-ion devices

Advance lies in electrode material made of lithium oxides in a cobalt oxide matrix
(p.6)

Chemistry Nobel Laureate Ahmed Zewail dies at age 70

Caltech chemist will be remembered for pioneering the field of femtochemistry and for promoting science education internationally
(p.7)

Iron catalysts diversify amino acids and peptides

New method mimics peptide-synthesis enzyme complexes found in microorganisms
(p.7)

Deals flourish in sulfur chemicals

Veolia and Ineos to boost presence in industry with acquisitions
(p.10)

GSK and Verily launch Galvani Bioelectronics

Drug giant and tech firm form a company to create therapies that use implantable devices
(p.10)

Pfizer acquires Bamboo Therapeutics

Deal brings gene therapy technology and key manufacturing capabilities
(p.11)

Rio Olympics teams with Dow to leave a low-carbon legacy

New materials and upgraded manufacturing to help Brazil reach its 2025 greenhouse gas goal
(p.11)

Refinery fostered weak safety, Chemical Safety Board says

Report probes sulfuric acid accidents that injured workers
(p.14)

Unapproved, genetically modified wheat disrupts U.S. trade

Japan, S. Korea halt U.S. wheat shipments following discovery of engineered wheat growing in Washington state
(p.14)
 

Departments

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Science & Technology

Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning untangles the complicated web of sports doping intrigue leading up to the Rio Olympics
(p.27)
With the ability to probe a wide range of materials, researchers, from paleontologists to catalyst chemists, flock to these powerful light sources
(pp. 28-33)
Officials can now check for long-ago anabolic steroid use, with gene doping tests on the horizon
(pp. 25-26)
El profesor de Química y bloguero de Compound Interest Andy Brunning desentrama la complicada red de intriga del dopaje deportivo que precede a los Juegos Olímpicos de Río.
(p.27)
El avance está en el material del electrodo, hecho de óxidos de litio en una matriz de óxido de cobalto.
(p.6)

Editor's Page