Copyright © 2016 American Chemical Society
 

August 22, 2016 Issue

Volume 94, Issue 33
09433-cov-cover
August 22, 2016 Issue, Vol. 94 | Iss. 33
This group of skilled young ‘operatives’ has been covertly using chemistry to safeguard the planet
By Lauren K. Wolf
(pp. 32-33)
Features
Government & Policy
European regulators worry about the inks used to make body decorations, which can be repurposed from the car paint, plastics, and textile dye industries (pp. 24-26)
Government & Policy
Economic crisis and hardships are spurring some to leave the country (pp. 28-29)
Back Issues
 

Cover Story: The Talented 12

Lauren Austin
Nuclear biochemistry snoop looks to bring advanced nanotech to big pharma
(p.34)
Luis Campos
Organic chemist is building a reputation for building overachieving materials
(p.35)
Karena Chapman
High-energy researcher is revealing the atomic details of materials with X-ray techniques
(p.36)
Anthony Estrada
Molecule builder is tackling the most daunting neurological disorders
(p.37)
Talented 12 by the numbers
Here’s how this year’s 
class stacks up
(pp. 38-39)
Daniel Fitzpatrick
Computer whiz wants to free synthetic chemists from mindless tasks
(p.40)
Lili He
Analytical scientist is working to keep contaminants off dinner plates
(p.41)
Juan Pablo Maianti
Chemical biologist is pioneering new approaches to treating diabetes
(p.42)
Bill Morandi
Reaction inventor seeks new ways to build valuable molecules
(p.43)
Laboratory Loves
We asked our secret agents which gadgets they can’t live without in the lab.
(pp. 44-45)
Alison Narayan
Synthetic chemist recruits enzymes to do handy but tricky chemistry
(p.46)
Renã Robinson
Analytical chemist is looking for the connections between the brain and other parts of the body in Alzheimer’s disease
(p.47)
Alex Spokoyny
Inorganic chemist performs new tricks with boron for catalysis, energy storage, and protein recognition
(p.48)
Ke Xu
Microscopy expert is pushing the limits of resolution to peek inside human cells
(p.49)
Talented 12 class of 2015: Where are they now?
Changing the world with feats of chemistry takes a while. So we asked our inaugural class what they’ve been up to this past year. No pressure.
(p.50)
 

News of the Week

ACS to launch chemistry preprint server

Authors will be able to deposit draft chemistry papers in online archive before publication
(p.5)

Metal-free metamaterials switch between blocking and transmitting light

Removing metals opens up possibilities for the engineered structures
(p.6)

AFM tips on demand

Thanks to 3-D printing, scientists can directly “write” custom AFM tips
(p.7)

Radiotracer helps neuroscientists study epigenetics in the brain

Molecule maps density of histone deacetylases in people
(p.7)

Membrane separates hydrocarbon isomers in energy-saving process

So-called carbon molecular sieve purifies precious para-xylene from an isomeric mix using reverse osmosis
(p.8)

Single agent targets three parasitic infections

Discovery could lead to improved drugs for Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, and sleeping sickness
(p.8)

Fracking air pollution study retracted

Corrected results show airborne pollutants near Ohio fracking operations do not pose elevated cancer risk
(p.9)

Potential new source of atmospheric aerosols identified

New study questions prevailing assumption that fatty acids aren’t photochemically active
(p.9)

Piramal expands in North America with acquisition of Ash Stevens

Indian firm gets one of the few independent U.S. pharma chemical makers
(p.11)

EC eyes Dow-DuPont deal

European regulators worry merger will undermine competition in agriculture
(p.13)

German chemical producers upbeat

Trio of specialty chemical firms raise their forecasts for 2016 despite flagging prices
(p.14)

Chemical regulation related to drop in U.S. illicit drug users

Study examines availability of substances used to manufacture cocaine, methamphetamine
(p.18)

Perfluorinated chemicals linked to military bases, airports

U.S. Air Force to adopt reformulated firefighting foams
(p.18)
 

Departments

09433-bus1-AirProductscxd

Business

Amid cheap commodities, chemical firms stoke the fire under consumer specialties
(pp. 20-21)
New products give, patent expirations take away, but results overall are up
(pp. 22-23)
Concentrates(pp. 15-16)
    09433-govpol1-openertatoocxd

    Government & Policy

    European regulators worry about the inks used to make body decorations, which can be repurposed from the car paint, plastics, and textile dye industries
    (pp. 24-26)
    Economic crisis and hardships are spurring some to leave the country
    (pp. 28-29)
    09433-cov-cover

    Science & Technology

    Inorganic chemist performs new tricks with boron for catalysis, energy storage, and protein recognition
    (p.48)
    Synthetic chemist recruits enzymes to do handy but tricky chemistry
    (p.46)
    High-energy researcher is revealing the atomic details of materials with X-ray techniques
    (p.36)
    Computer whiz wants to free synthetic chemists from mindless tasks
    (p.40)
    We asked our secret agents which gadgets they can’t live without in the lab.
    (pp. 44-45)
    Two recent studies shed light on polymer elasticity and crystallization
    (pp. 30-31)
    Chemical biologist is pioneering new approaches to treating diabetes
    (p.42)
    Reaction inventor seeks new ways to build valuable molecules
    (p.43)
    Molecule builder is tackling the most daunting neurological disorders
    (p.37)
    Changing the world with feats of chemistry takes a while. So we asked our inaugural class what they’ve been up to this past year. No pressure.
    (p.50)
    This group of skilled young ‘operatives’ has been covertly using chemistry to safeguard the planet
    (pp. 32-33)
    Nuclear biochemistry snoop looks to bring advanced nanotech to big pharma
    (p.34)
    Analytical chemist is looking for the connections between the brain and other parts of the body in Alzheimer’s disease
    (p.47)
    Microscopy expert is pushing the limits of resolution to peek inside human cells
    (p.49)
    Analytical scientist is working to keep contaminants off dinner plates
    (p.41)
    Organic chemist is building a reputation for building overachieving materials
    (p.35)
    Here’s how this year’s 
class stacks up
    (pp. 38-39)