Copyright © 2017 American Chemical Society
 

June 12, 2017 Issue

Volume 95, Issue 24
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June 12, 2017 Issue, Vol. 95 | Iss. 24
Plant scientists are using the gene editing method to make higher-quality, more sustainable agriculture products, but consumer acceptance is not guaranteed
By Melody M. Bomgardner
(pp. 30-34)
Features
Science & Technology
Experimental challenges contributed to the controversy over claims of creating the elusive material (pp. 16-17)
Science & Technology
Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning explains the drugs behind the public health crisis (p.24)
Back Issues
 
These four foods are ripe for CRISPR gene editing
Agriculture observers see tomatoes, mushrooms, wheat, and corn among the first to benefit from the hot new technique
(p.33)
 

News of the Week

Geraldine Richmond named 2018 Priestley Medalist

University of Oregon chemist honored for studies of water interfaces and worldwide promotion of chemistry
(p.3 )

Revisemos lo que falló en el trágico estudio clínico de Francia

Unos químicos rastrean las enzimas que podrían haber contribuido a la neurotoxicidad de un potencial medicamento.
(p.5 )
 

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Departments

Business

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New production technologies open the door to niche applications
Pitiful performers in the 2000s, styrenic resins are now among the chemical industry’s hottest businesses
Plant scientists are using the gene editing method to make higher-quality, more sustainable agriculture products, but consumer acceptance is not guaranteed
Agriculture observers see tomatoes, mushrooms, wheat, and corn among the first to benefit from the hot new technique

Science & Technology

09524-scitech3-opioids
Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning explains the drugs behind the public health crisis
A comic collaboration between C&EN and ChemScrapes cartoonist Brendan Burkett
Experimental challenges contributed to the controversy over claims of creating the elusive material
Wine chemist Andrew Waterhouse talks about teaching a generation of winemakers