Copyright © 2017 American Chemical Society
 

August 21, 2017 Issue

Volume 95, Issue 33
09533-cover1-opener
August 21, 2017 Issue, Vol. 95 | Iss. 33
This team of up-and-comers has big ideas for solving global problems with chemistry
By
(pp. 40-41)
Features
Business
Plant scientists dispute claims by the herbicide’s manufacturers that new formulations can be used safely (pp. 27-29)
Science & Technology
Looking at the sun can set off damaging radical reactions in the eye (pp. 31-33)
Back Issues
 

Cover Story: C&EN’s Talented 12

Fikile Brushett
Combining chemistry and modeling to advance energy storage devices
(p.42)
Luke Connal
Synthesizing enzyme-mimicking materials to improve everyday products
(p.43)
Jillian Dempsey
Probing catalysts to help artificial photosynthesis fill fuel tanks of the future
(p.44)
Daniel DiRocco
Devising the optimum reactions for making life-saving molecules
(p.45)
Talented 12 by the numbers
Here are the stats for this year’s dream team
(pp. 46-47)
Michael Feasel
Combatting the opioid epidemic by studying drug toxicity
(p.48)
Renee Frontiera
Developing spectroscopic tools to extract chemical and structural details from cells and other substances
(p.49)
Marie Heffern
Uncovering the roles of trace metals in hormone biology
(p.50)
Ashish Kulkarni
Creating immunotherapies to simultaneously treat cancer and track people’s responses
(p.51)
Laboratory loves
We asked this year’s all-stars for the one thing they need to survive in the lab
(pp. 52-53)
Corinna Schindler
Designing environmentally benign reactions for building biologically important molecules
(p.54)
Staff Sheehan
Inventing commercially viable catalysts for renewable fuels
(p.55)
Bozhi Tian
Dreaming up ways to probe and control electrical signaling in cells
(p.56)
Florence Wagner
Making psychiatric drug discovery less risky
(p.57)
Talented 12 alumni: Where are they now?
Since they made our list, the 2015 and 2016 alumni have been busy.
(p.58)
 

News of the Week

‘Magic mushroom’ enzyme mystery solved

Researchers unravel the biosynthesis of the psychoactive drug psilocybin, making large-scale production a possibility
(p.4)

Resuelto el misterio de la enzima del “champiñón mágico”

Unos investigadores descubren la biosíntesis de la psilocibina, una droga psicoactiva. Esto podría facilitar su producción a gran escala.
(p.4)

Chemistry preprint servers launched

Beta ChemRxiv site and ChemRN are now accepting manuscripts from the chemistry community ahead of peer review
(p.6)

Structure of superlong, ice-binding protein reported

Adhesin protein helps Antarctic bacteria stick to ice and photosynthetic diatoms at same time
(p.6)

Electric current jump-starts diamine synthesis

Mild electrosynthesis bypasses existing methods’ limitations
(p.8)

Probiotic prevents sepsis in infants

Treatment could reduce infections responsible for neonatal deaths in the developing world
(p.8)

Researchers estimate amount of lead released from Flint water pipes

Lack of orthophosphate corrosion control contributed to city’s water crisis, according to new analysis
(p.9)

Secrets of stimulant abused in Middle East revealed

Vaccines help uncover how “pharmacoterrorism” drug fenethylline works in the body
(p.10)

Organic semiconductor film enhances Raman signals

Substrate boosts signal even without metals, but adding metals multiplies the effect
(p.11)

Access to European market concerns U.K. chemical makers

A recovery in Europe bodes well, but Brexit complications could blunt exports
(p.15)

Trump disbands manufacturing council

Decision follows exodus started by Merck CEO Frazier after Charlottesville violence
(p.15)

Drug firms sell off plants

Series of divestment announcements shows trend is not abating
(p.16)

GSK to end neuroscience R&D in China

Shanghai was once the hub of the company’s neuroscience research effort
(p.17)

Court strikes down U.S. restrictions on HFCs

EPA rule had limited potent greenhouse gases, boosted market for HFO substitutes
(p.20)

U.S. academic biomedical labs said to be unready for disasters

National Academies report outlines recommendations for preparation and recovery
(p.20)
 

Departments

ACS News

Divisions issue calls for papers for the March 18–22 meeting in New Orleans
(p.61)
09533-scitech2-ctwcxd-700

Science & Technology

Harvard materials chemist Joanna Aizenberg says there’s been an evolution to her approach
(pp. 32-33)
Combining chemistry and modeling to advance energy storage devices
(p.42)
Synthesizing enzyme-mimicking materials to improve everyday products
(p.43)
Probing catalysts to help artificial photosynthesis fill fuel tanks of the future
(p.44)
Devising the optimum reactions for making life-saving molecules
(p.45)
Combatting the opioid epidemic by studying drug toxicity
(p.48)
Developing spectroscopic tools to extract chemical and structural details from cells and other substances
(p.49)
Creating immunotherapies to simultaneously treat cancer and track people’s responses
(p.51)
Looking at the sun can set off damaging radical reactions in the eye
(pp. 31-33)
Chemical educator and Compound Interest blogger Andy Brunning explains how refrigerants help keep us cool on hot summer days
(p.39)
Designing environmentally benign reactions for building biologically important molecules
(p.54)
Inventing commercially viable catalysts for renewable fuels
(p.55)
Making psychiatric drug discovery less risky
(p.57)
Uncovering the roles of trace metals in hormone biology
(p.50)
Dreaming up ways to probe and control electrical signaling in cells
(p.56)
We asked this year’s all-stars for the one thing they need to survive in the lab
(pp. 52-53)
Here are the stats for this year’s dream team
(pp. 46-47)
This team of up-and-comers has big ideas for solving global problems with chemistry
(pp. 40-41)
Since they made our list, the 2015 and 2016 alumni have been busy.
(p.58)
Cryopreservation technique combines nanorods with antifreeze to improve viability of widely used lab animals
(p.12)
Devices could power wearable and implantable medical devices with reduced chemical risk
(p.12)
Simple synthesis and useful nonlinear optical properties may be a boon for short-wavelength photonics
(p.12)
Protein helps Antarctic bacteria stick to ice and photosynthetic diatoms at same time
(p.6)
For decades past and future, chemical innovations indelibly impact how our homes look, feel, and function.
(pp. 22-25)

Career & Employment

The things we carry around say a lot about what we do as chemists
(p.38)

Editor's Page