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Web Date: June 1, 2012

Updating The Periodic Table

Nomenclature: International committee approves flerovium and livermorium as names for elements 114 and 116
Department: Science & Technology | Collection: Periodic table
Keywords: superheavy elements, element 114, element 116, flerovium, livermorium, IUPAC

More than 10 years after their first identification, elements 114 and 116 now have names: flerovium (Fl) and livermorium (Lv), respectively. The International Union of Pure & Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) this week approved the names, which were selected by the discovering teams.

Flerovium pays tribute to the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, in Dubna, Russia, where element 114 was first identified in 1999. Livermorium pays tribute to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in Livermore, Calif., where scientists sighted element 116 in 2000. Scientists at the Livermore facility retracted a 1999 sighting of element 116 after one of the team members was found to have falsified data.

Last year, an IUPAC and International Union of Pure & Applied Physics joint committee officially gave the elements a place on the periodic table (C&EN, June 13, 2011, page 33). IUPAC will publish the new names in the July issue of Pure & Applied Chemistry. For years, the teams in Dubna and Livermore have worked together and separately to discover and confirm the existence of other superheavy elements in addition to flerovium and livermorium. In 2002, scientists at both sites observed element 118. The new names honor, in part, “the collaboration that has occurred between scientists” in Russia and the U.S., says William H. Goldstein, associate director of LLNL’s Physical & Life Sciences Directorate.

 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © American Chemical Society
Comments
Eric Scerri (Fri Jun 01 22:38:44 EDT 2012)
An interesting development and good to see two new official members have joined the periodic table club.

Does the use by IUPAC of Fl for flerovium violate the rule that obsolete symbols cannot be recycled?

Remember the problems with the symbol Cp for copernicium, because casseiopeium (symbol Cp) was an older name for lutetium (and Cp is used for the cyclopentadienyl ligand as well).

The name florentium was proposed by the Italians Rolla and Fernandes in 1924 for element 61 (now promethium). But they actually proposed Fr as symbol for florentium and not Fl. As a consequence, the use of the symbol Fr for francium might be against the IUPAC rules?

all the best
eric scerri (author of forthcoming book, A Tale of Seven Elements, OUP).
Please also see ericscerri.com/ for many resources on elements and the periodic table.



Eric Scerri (Fri Jun 01 22:39:40 EDT 2012)
An interesting development and good to see two new official members have joined the periodic table club.

Does the use by IUPAC of Fl for flerovium violate the rule that obsolete symbols cannot be recycled?

Remember the problems with the symbol Cp for copernicium, because casseiopeium (symbol Cp) was an older name for lutetium (and Cp is used for the cyclopentadienyl ligand as well).

The name florentium was proposed by the Italians Rolla and Fernandes in 1924 for element 61 (now promethium). But they actually proposed Fr as symbol for florentium and not Fl. As a consequence, the use of the symbol Fr for francium might be against the IUPAC rules?

all the best
eric scerri (author of forthcoming book, A Tale of Seven Elements, OUP).
Please also see ericscerri.com/ for many resources on elements and the periodic table.



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