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Analytical Chemistry

Agilent Technologies' Prototype

by Celia Henry Arnaud
July 8, 2013 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 91, ISSUE 27

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Credit: Jody May & John McLean/Vanderbilt
The prototype instrument can separate phosphatidylethanolamine lipids by ion mobility and mass spectrometry. The bands represent different charge states.
09127-scitech2-lipidscxd.jpg
Credit: Jody May & John McLean/Vanderbilt
The prototype instrument can separate phosphatidylethanolamine lipids by ion mobility and mass spectrometry. The bands represent different charge states.

Agilent Technologies will soon join the ranks of companies that offer an instrument that integrates ion mobility and mass spectrometry. Ion mobility, which separates ions on the basis of their shape, provides an extra separation dimension to mass spectrometry, which is based on mass-to-charge ratio. Ions are analyzed in the instrument’s 80-cm ion mobility drift tube and then directed to its iFunnel Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight LC/MS system. Agilent’s new instrument is in final development, and the company expects production systems to start shipping at the end of 2013.

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