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Materials

Stanley M. Barkin

by Susan J. Ainsworth
January 13, 2014 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 92, ISSUE 2

Stanley M. Barkin, 87, a retired associate director of the National Academy of Sciences Materials Advisory Board in Washington, D.C., died on Nov. 12, 2013, at his home in Wheeling, W.Va., after being diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome two years ago.

Born in the Bronx, N.Y., Barkin served in the Army and Air Force during World War II. He earned a B.S. in chemistry from Brooklyn College in 1948 before earning an M.S. in physical chemistry at Stevens Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in polymer chemistry from Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (now Polytechnic Institute of New York University) in 1956.

Early in his career, he worked for Texus, Ethicon, and Colgate-Palmolive. He joined U.S. Steel from 1971 until 1975, when he moved to the NAS advisory board. He served as an adjunct professor at Seton Hall University, Marymount University, and Wheeling Jesuit University. He retired in 1991, but worked for the National Science Foundation for one year.

Barkin was an emeritus member of ACS, joining in 1956.

He enjoyed the arts and playing golf and was an amateur pilot as well as a stamp collector, sports enthusiast, animal lover, and humanitarian.

Barkin is survived by two daughters, Nina Kickler and Diane; three grandchildren; and his longtime companion, Drusilla Ice.

Obituary notices of no more than 300 words may be sent to Susan J. Ainsworth at s_ainsworth@acs.org and should include an educational and professional history.

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