ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Synthesis

Poetic Research

September 28, 2015 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 93, ISSUE 38

Aug. 24, page 3: The Science & Technology Concentrate about potential antialcoholism agents incorrectly states that naltrexone is addictive and can cause depression. It can cause gastrointestinal problems.
◾ Sept. 7, page 3: The blue spheres on the cover of the magazine were described incorrectly in the table of contents. They represent magnesium ions essential for the cutting of DNA, not positions where Cas9 cuts DNA.

After reading about the research of my University of Pennsylvania colleague Eric J. Schelter in “A New Degree of Separation for Rare-Earth Metals” (C&EN, June 8, page 24), I wrote a poem.

Gimme Schelter
Gimme Schelter, for he’s the man
Who separates rare earths as fast as one can
For that all he needs is a simple ligand
And a tridentate nitroxide is at his command
So far he has separated two rare earths
Neodymium from Dysprosium dependent on girth
For each complex dimerizes differently
Which changes a lot their solubility
The Neodymium completely enters into solution
While Dysprosium precipitates with good resolution
Thus 50:50 powder mixtures can yield
Ninety-five percent pure metals. His fame, it is sealed
So a fortune awaits the brilliant inventor
Of this new technology, he’s right at the center

Andrew R. McGhie
Philadelphia

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment