ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Environment

Greenhouse gas emissions may impact future wind energy generation

by Jeff Johnson, special to C&EN
December 18, 2017 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 95, ISSUE 49

[+]Enlarge
Credit: Shutterstock
Because climate change alters global atmospheric circulation, the power generation capacity of North American wind farms may fall in the future.
Credit: Shutterstock
Because climate change alters global atmospheric circulation, the power generation capacity of North American wind farms may fall in the future.

Wind energy is a growing renewable energy source with great potential, but greenhouse gas emissions and climate change may influence wind energy’s future availability across the globe. In the next century, because of climate change, wind resources may decrease in the Northern Hemisphere and sharply increase in hot spots in southern latitudes and the tropics, according to a study by University of Colorado, Boulder, researchers (Nat. Geosci. 2017, DOI: 10.1038/s41561-017-0029-9). Wind energy resources are an integral part of many nations’ strategies to meet carbon dioxide emissions reduction targets. Globally, installed wind power capacity has grown by some 22% per year since 2006, and wind power now provides about 3.7% of energy worldwide. However, assessments of future wind energy resources are usually based on today’s climate without considering that anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions will continue to modify global atmospheric circulation and temperature. In the new work, the researchers combined wind industry power calculations with an ensemble of 10 global climate models under high and low greenhouse gas emissions scenarios.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment