ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Mergers & Acquisitions

Biobased chemical maker Lygos enters cannabinoid market

by Melody M. Bomgardner
January 16, 2020 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 98, ISSUE 3

Lygos, a start-up that’s scaling up production of the industrial monomer malonic acid using yeast fermentation, has acquired Librede, a fermentation specialist targeting a very different market: cannabinoids. The two firms have long known each other as members of California’s synthetic biology community, Lygos CEO Eric Steen tells C&EN. He points out that while their markets differ, the purified, rare cannabinoids that Librede makes share structural components with malonic acid. The companies have not disclosed the cannabinoids they plan to sell, but Librede’s process can make common ones such as cannabidiol and tetrahydrocannabinol as well as rare compounds including cannabigerol, cannabichromene, and molecules that have a pentyl group rather than the more typical propyl group. Those molecules, which include cannabidivarin, are hypothesized to have different health effects than their more ordinary cousins. Lygos will apply its expertise in scale-up and purification to make the ingredients for the cosmetics market later this year. That timeline will help Lygos generate sales before it begins building its malonic acid facility in 2022 or 2023, Steen says.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Comments
István Ujváry (January 17, 2020 4:35 AM)
"molecules that have a pentyl group rather than the more typical propyl group"
SHOULD HAVE BEEN:
'molecules that have a propyl group rather than the more typical pentyl group'
István Ujváry (January 17, 2020 4:40 AM)
"molecules that have a pentyl group rather than the more typical propyl group"
SHOULD HAVE BEEN:
'molecules that have a propyl group rather than the more typical pentyl group'

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment