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Electronic Materials

Chemistry in Pictures: Science nonfiction

by Melissa Gilden
November 8, 2019

20191108lnp20-hand.jpg
Credit: ACS Materials Lett.

Stretchable luminescent displays could find broad application in wearable electronics, including sensors and light-emitting and energy-harvesting devices. However, those displays normally require high operating voltages to achieve sufficient brightness, a quality that would render a wearable device unsafe. Yunlei Zhou at Nanjing University and colleagues were trying to develop an alternating-current electroluminescent device by incorporating ceramic nanoparticles into a polar polymer. The aim was to create dielectric, or insulating, nanocomposites, which would enable a low voltage luminescent display. Using the new nanocomposites, the researchers made a stretchable display which they integrated into the hand-wearable stop watch shown here.

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