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Vaccines

NIH begins universal flu vaccine tests

by Lisa M. Jarvis
April 5, 2019 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 97, ISSUE 14

 

09714-buscon17-influenzacxd.jpg
Credit: Linda M. Stannard/University of Cape Town/Science Source
A colored transmission electron micrograph of flu virus particles

The US National Institutes of Health is launching the first human study of a universal flu vaccine, developed by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases scientists. Called H1ssF_3928, the vaccine is a ferritin nanoparticle dotted with part of hemagglutinin, one of two main proteins on the surface of the flu virus. NIH hopes to understand whether the vaccine can train the immune system to respond to a range of influenza subtypes and whether that response differs among age groups. The first results of the study are expected in early 2020.

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