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Image credit: Andy Brunning
Image credit: Andy Brunning

#RealTimeElements Week Awards

In celebration of 2019’s International Year of the Periodic Table (IYPT), C&EN’s Chemistry in Pictures and @RealTimeChem are teaming up to present #RealTimeElements Week, Nov. 11–17, 2019. If you’ve got a photo or video that stars a particular element—for example, a ruthenium catalyst or a neon gas—we want to see it!

How to enter

Entries for #RealTimeElements Week can be an image or video and must clearly be connected to a particular element in the periodic table, either visually or in the description submitted. Entries may be made on Twitter or Instagram using the #RealTimeElements hashtag. Entries may also be submitted through the online form below for those who wish to remain anonymous or who do not use Twitter or Facebook.

Awards

You can submit entries in two categories: (1) video and (2) image. Each will have a grand prize and two runners-up. All winners will receive a limited-edition C&EN IYPT travel mug. The grand-prize winners will also receive a $50 gift card and a special print of their image or a film-reel-style print of shots from their video.

Credit: Lea Nienhaus
All hail halides: Perovskite nanocrystals glow various colors when exposed to a series of halides.
Credit: Mirry Criel
Truly sublime: When gaseous iodine hit this cooled tube, it deposited into a solid and formed dark purple crystals.
Credit: David Zigler
Colorful chromium: This reaction shimmers with a purple hue thanks to chromium(III) chloride.
Credit: Pedro Amaral
Lightning in a bottle: Excited argon radicals release light as they return to their ground state.
Credit: Ralph Lange
Liquid rainbow: A solid chunk of bismuth is melted into a liquid for crystallization.

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