ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Synthesis

Chemistry in Pictures: Fire in ice

by Craig Bettenhausen
May 28, 2019

20190524lnp20-fireinice.jpg
Credit: David Gygi

TEMPO, also known as (2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl, is an unusual substance. Its unpaired electron makes it a radical, but it is much more stable than most radicals in part because that unpaired electron is delocalized across two atoms. Because of its unusual properties, TEMPO has an array of applications, including in spectroscopy, catalysis, and the labeling of biological samples. David Gygi of Harvard University got these large TEMPO crystals by purifying the compound via sublimation.

Submitted by David Gygi

Do science. Take pictures. Win money. Enter our photo contest here.

Related C&EN Content:

Photoredox Catalysis Activates Aryl C–H Bonds In Amination Reaction

Electrosynthesis gives organic chemists more power

How Redox Flow Batteries Could Stabilize Our Electric Grids 

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment