Volume 91 Issue 44 | p. 11 | News of The Week
Issue Date: November 4, 2013 | Web Date: November 1, 2013

ACS Expands Open Access

Publishing: New open-access journal, more licensing options for authors in 2014
Department: Science & Technology
Keywords: open access, American Chemical Society
ACS’s New Open-Access Initiatives

ACS Central ScienceACS’s first pure open-access, peer-reviewed journal will be launched in 2014.

ACS Editors’ Choice—One article published in a subscription-based ACS journal will be made openly accessible every day beginning on Jan. 1, 2014.

ACS Author Rewards—Corresponding authors of articles published in ACS journals in 2014 will get a $1,500 credit per article, which can be used to pay for open-access fees starting in 2015 and until 2017.

ACS AuthorChoice—Existing program will be expanded for new features, including more licensing options.

SOURCE: ACS Publications

The American Chemical Society, a major publisher of scientific journals in chemistry and related fields, is making big changes to its open-access policies beginning in 2014. For the first time, ACS, which publishes C&EN, will launch a peer-reviewed journal that is free for readers and authors. The society will also offer more licensing options for authors and a reward system to help authors pay for open-access fees in traditional, subscription-based ACS journals.

The new open-access journal will be called ACS Central Science. Many details have yet to be released, but ACS says it will be a highly selective, peer-reviewed journal that will publish “multidisciplinary research from across the broad spectrum of the chemical sciences.” The publication will be led by a prominent scientist and active researcher, who is likely to be named next spring.

ACS Central Science is expected to publish hundreds of open-access research articles during its early years, says Susan King, senior vice president of the ACS journals publishing division. The journal is also expected to feature commentary and analysis of global trends in science R&D, technology, education, and policy.

In addition, ACS will begin making one article from across its 44 subscription-based journals freely available each day beginning on Jan. 1, 2014. The articles will be of broad public interest and will be nominated by the more than 400 ACS journal editors who are active researchers.

ACS is also expanding the options in its current fee-based open-access program. Authors who publish in subscription-based ACS journals have had the option since 2006 to pay a fee to make their article freely available immediately upon publication. In 2014, authors will have an expanded menu of licensing options to allow the final published article of record to be openly available. Authors will also be able to choose between immediate or 12-month delayed open access, which will carry different fees. Additional details, including discounts for ACS members, are available at www.acsopenaccess.org.

Furthermore, ACS is introducing a reward system that will give credits to corresponding authors of each paper published in ACS journals in 2014. These credits—valued at $1,500 per article published—can be used to pay for any ACS open-access option beginning in 2015 and until 2017.

Some open-access advocates have long viewed ACS as moving too slowly toward universal access. “ACS is probably the most conservative publisher in the galaxy,” says Peter Murray-Rust, a molecular informatics expert at Cambridge University and a critic of ACS policies on open access.

“We are seeing a changing landscape. We are seeing more drive for open access from institutions and from funding agencies,” King says. “These bold, new, and expanded open-access programs from ACS reinforce our drive for sustainable universal access to the results of scientific research.”

ACS publishes about 40,000 journal articles each year. To date, authors and funding agencies have paid fees to make only about 1% of those articles available free as open access. ACS hopes the initiatives “will encourage more authors to select open-access publishing options for ACS journals,” says ACS Publications Division President Brian Crawford.

 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © American Chemical Society
Comments
Egon Willighagen (Fri Nov 01 05:49:48 EDT 2013)
What license will the new ACS Central Science journal use? And, will authors keep authorship/copyright, or will that still be reassigned to the ACS?
Jack Ochs, ACS (Thu Nov 14 14:28:36 EST 2013)
Thank you for your questions and your interest in ACS Central Science. In response to your questions, in the course of publishing articles in the new journal, authors will first sign the ACS’s standard Journal Publishing Agreement, found here: http://pubs.acs.org/page/copyright/journals/index.html. (By using this agreement, ACS obtains copyright from the author(s) and also grants a broad range of reuse rights to our authors.)

For those articles that are subsequently accepted for publication in ACS Central Science, authors will then be extended the benefits of our ACS AuthorChoice open access publishing license on a complimentary basis; no fee will be entailed.

For those authors who wish to publish under the terms of a Creative Commons open access license, ACS will be pleased to provide that option, which will entail a fee ($500 for authors who are ACS members; $1000 for non-members).
Paul Bracher (Fri Nov 01 10:46:47 EDT 2013)
C&EN's blog portal is already called "Central Science", and the name works well because the first three letters are C-E-N. It seems like a weird move to steal this name for a journal.
KEVIN DAVIES (Thu Nov 07 16:23:11 EST 2013)
There is indeed an undeniable resemblance between the title of the forthcoming ACS open-access journal, ACS Central Science, and the home of the C&EN blogs, “CENtral Science.” Our selection of the journal’s name had nothing to do with the C&EN blog, but was rather a reflection of the widespread description of chemistry as the “central science,” which we feel is a highly appropriate title for a journal that will strive to publish a broad swathe of interdisciplinary research grounded in chemistry.

We are optimistic that ACS members and C&EN readers will be able to distinguish the two but will revisit the issue should this prove not to be the case.

Kevin Davies PhD
ACS
Gabriel da Silva (Tue Nov 05 21:18:27 EST 2013)
I like the idea of providing authors with credits for publishing with ACS, but it is a shame this wasn't extended to reviewers as well. Seems like a missed opportunity to throw reviewers a bone given the valuable unpaid work they do for the Society.

Archana Singh (Fri Dec 27 05:39:28 EST 2013)
I am a bit unclear about what you told Egon Willighagen. Will authors have to pay some fee to ACS for publishing their articles in ACS Central Science, and will only then ACS will extend the ACS AuthorChoice open-access license to them?
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