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Art & Artifacts

Chemistry in Pictures: Ye olde centrifuge

by Manny Morone
September 25, 2018

 

20180925lnp20-yeoldecentrifuge.jpg
Credit: Kelsey McCoy
20180925lnp20-gifyeoldecentrifuge.gif
Credit: Kelsey McCoy

One of Kelsey McCoy’s labmates got sick of going up two flights of stairs to spin his samples on the communal preparatory centrifuge. So he dug this hand-cranked centrifuge out of a closet and started using it to spin his cell samples. He and McCoy, a Ph.D. student in Ann McDermott’s lab at Columbia University, research protein structures with solid-state NMR spectroscopy and prepare cell and protein samples by pelleting them out with a centrifuge. Although a person can spin the centrifuge fast enough for this application, it became a bit too tedious to use regularly, McCoy says.

Credit: Kelsey McCoy


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