Volume 89 Issue 47 | p. 24 | Concentrates
Issue Date: November 21, 2011

How To Repair Spill’s Damage

Department: Government & Policy
Keywords: Deepwater Horizon, gulf spill, damage
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Fire boat response crews battle the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon explosion and oil spill.
Credit: U.S. Coast Guard
NEW ORLEANS - Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon April 21, 2010. A Coast Guard MH-65C dolphin rescue helicopter and crew document the fire aboard the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon, while searching for survivors April 21, 2010. Multiple Coast Guard helicopters, planes and cutters responded to rescue the Deepwater Horizon's 126 person crew.
 
Fire boat response crews battle the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon explosion and oil spill.
Credit: U.S. Coast Guard

Extensive research will be needed to properly assess the ecological and environmental damage caused in the Gulf by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, according to an interim report released by the National Research Council on Nov. 10. The report also noted that developing a restoration plan for the area will require a broad effort that includes rehabilitating damaged fisheries and replacing natural resources. Larry A. Mayer, chair of the committee that wrote the report, director of the Center for Coastal & Ocean Mapping, and professor of earth sciences and ocean engineering at the University of New Hampshire, said in a statement, “It will be a challenge to assess the full scope of impacts from this spill—the biggest in U.S. history—and ensure that valuable services are fully restored for the region and ultimately the nation.” NRC will release a final report, sponsored by NOAA, in the spring of 2013.

 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © American Chemical Society

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