Volume 90 Issue 24 | p. 37 | Concentrates
Issue Date: June 11, 2012

Light Releases Antibacterial NO

Material loaded with a manganese nitrosyl complex could be used to treat battlefield wounds
Department: Science & Technology
News Channels: Biological SCENE, Materials SCENE, JACS In C&EN
Keywords: nitric oxide, mesoporous material, antibiotic, antibacterial, drug-resistant
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Credit: Adapted from J. Am. Chem. Soc.
This is a rendition of mesopores filled with an NO-releasing compound.
 
Credit: Adapted from J. Am. Chem. Soc.
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A manganese nitrosyl complex lodged inside mesopores releases NO that wipes out bacteria; Mn = purple, O = red, N = blue, C = gray.
Credit: Adapted from J. Am. Chem. Soc
This is a ball and stick structure of manganese nitrosyl.
 
A manganese nitrosyl complex lodged inside mesopores releases NO that wipes out bacteria; Mn = purple, O = red, N = blue, C = gray.
Credit: Adapted from J. Am. Chem. Soc

A porous material hosting a manganese complex that releases nitric oxide upon exposure to light could be used to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wounds (J. Am. Chem. Soc., DOI: 10.1021/ja3022736). Nitric oxide can destroy bacteria via a number of routes—for example, by oxidizing cellular DNA or lipids in the cellular membrane. These multiple pathways should prevent microbes from becoming resistant to NO-based treatments. Researchers have been exploring strategies to administer NO as an antibacterial; as a gas, the molecule has been difficult to control. Pradip K. Mascharak and colleagues at the University of California, Santa Cruz, have now harnessed a photoactive manganese nitrosyl complex developed in their lab by packing the compound inside a meso­porous aluminosilicate material. They tested the resulting powder’s bactericidal powers on an agar gel “wound” impregnated with the pernicious drug-resistant bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii. This microbe has been nicknamed “Iraqibacter” after outbreaks of infections occurred in soldiers wounded in Iraq. When exposed to visible light equivalent to that emitted on a sunny day (about 100 mW/cm2), the material rapidly releases NO, which eradicates the bacteria.

 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © American Chemical Society

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