ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Policy

Review Of Ship Discharges Sought

by Cheryl Hogue
May 20, 2013 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 91, ISSUE 20

[+]Enlarge
Credit: Ian McCarthy
Gannets (in foreground) and guillemots are among the seabirds that died after being coated with polyisobutene.
09120-govcon-birdscxd.jpg
Credit: Ian McCarthy
Gannets (in foreground) and guillemots are among the seabirds that died after being coated with polyisobutene.

Conservation organizations and shipping industry groups are seeking a review of international rules governing polyisobutene (PIB) releases from ships. The chemical, used as an additive for lubricants and fuel oils, was identified as the sticky substance coating seabirds along the southwest coast of England earlier this year. The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSBP) estimates that more than 4,000 birds washed up on beaches along the English Channel in two incidents. PIB is not directly toxic to seabirds, RSPB says. But when in contact with water, the hydrophobic chemical coalesces into a waxy material. When PIB coats the plumage of seabirds, their movement is restricted, RSPB says. Under the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, vessels can legally discharge small amounts of PIB. British conservation and shipping organizations are calling for the International Maritime Organization to review PIB releases.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment