From C&EN Archives | Chemical & Engineering News
Volume 91 Issue 36 | p. 49
Issue Date: September 9, 2013

Cover Stories: Nine For Ninety

From C&EN Archives: Structural Biology

Department: Science & Technology | Collection: Life Sciences
Keywords: proteins, structural biology, crystallography
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Credit: C&EN Archives
A man in glasses and a tie works with a large molecular modeling of a protein.
 
Credit: C&EN Archives

Protein Structure When Michael G. Rossmann solved the crystal structure of lactate dehydrogenase, C&EN visited the lab to photograph the pioneering structural biologist hard at work developing a stick atomic model of the 310-amino-acid protein.

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From left, Wilkins, Perutz, Crick, John Steinbeck (who won that year for literature), Watson, and Kendrew.
Credit: C&EN Archives
Six men in white tie attire pose for a photo.
 
From left, Wilkins, Perutz, Crick, John Steinbeck (who won that year for literature), Watson, and Kendrew.
Credit: C&EN Archives

Award Winning In 1962, the founders of structural biology won their share of Nobel Prizes. Max F. Perutz and John Kendrew shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for establishing tools to discover the structure of proteins, while James D. Watson, Francis H. C. Crick, and Maurice H. F. Wilkins won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work on solving the structure of DNA.

 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © American Chemical Society

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