ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Energy

Making a safer lithium-ion battery

Electrode coating brings performance of nonflammable aqueous batteries more in line with commercial devices

by Tien Nguyen
October 11, 2017

Credit: C&EN

The lithium-ion batteries in our electronic devices use organic electrolytes to help store charge. The problem is that these electrolytes are flammable. Li-ion batteries that replace those electrolytes with water-based versions remove the risk of explosions but don’t perform as well.

To tackle this shortcoming, a team of researchers led by the University of Maryland’s Chunsheng Wang and the U.S. Army Research Lab’s Kang Xu have developed a fluorinated polymer coating that protects the anode in aqueous batteries. By shielding the anode from degradation by the water-based electrolyte, the coating enables the batteries to reach 4.0 V—the voltage level of today’s commercial Li-ion batteries (Joule 2017, DOI: 10.1016/j.joule.2017.08.009).

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment