ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Materials

Chemistry in Pictures: Cascade of chemiluminescence

by Manny Morone
April 16, 2020

 

20200416lnp20-vials.jpg
Credit: Qun Song

Qun Song, Mingming Ma, and their team at the University of Science and Technology of China created this rainbow of colors starting with just one common luminescent molecule, luminol. By adding different reagents and other fluorescent molecules, they produced a range of colors through what’s called a cascade energy transfer, in which, starting with luminol, molecules in the vials emit and absorb different energies of light to produce desired colors. First in the cascade, luminol releases blue light when it gets oxidized by hydrogen peroxide and a cobalt catalyst. To get the next colors, the team added a second molecule—a fluorescent dye—to each vial to capture luminol’s blue light and then re-emit another color. In some of these vials, the researchers included a fluorescent third molecule that captures the second molecule’s emitted light and then produces another color.

Credit: Qun Song. Find out how the team pulled this off in their ACS Nano paper (2020, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.0c00847).

Do science. Take pictures. Win money. Enter our photo contest here.

Click here to see more Chemistry in Pictures.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment