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Inorganic Chemistry

Chemistry in Pictures: True Blood

by Alexandra Taylor
October 24, 2019

20191024lnp20-iron.jpg
Credit: Marius Pelmus

Purification of iron(III) acetylacetonate, or a tasty drink for vampires? Marius Pelmus, a PhD candidate at Seton Hall University, was leading an experiment for an undergraduate inorganic chemistry lab. But then something spooky happened: when the iron complex was being separated from the original mixture via vacuum filtration, a mysterious red solid appeared. So Pelmus dissolved the solid in ethyl acetate and used gravity to filter out the remaining iron(III) acetylacetonate, which is the bloody looking concoction you see here. We should mention that Pelmus hails from Romania, the borders of which contain modern-day Transylvania. Coincidence? You decide.

Submitted by Marius Pelmus

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