ADVERTISEMENT
4 /5 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Imaging

Chemistry in Pictures: Hot and cold chemistry

by Craig Bettenhausen
October 3, 2018

 

20181003lnp20-hotandcoldchemistry.jpg
Credit: Alexander Lyapunov

Alexander Lyapunov wanted a different perspective on a simple acetone distillation. So he brought a thermal camera to the lab. The hot plate shines the brightest, and the hot acetone vapor is visible all the way up the column and into the distillation head. But the cold water flowing through the outer jacket of the condenser drops the temperature rapidly, causing the vapor to condense into liquid and flow into the receiving flask (far right). Visualizations like this one help students to understand what’s going on in their laboratory glassware during experiments.

Submitted by Alexander Lyapunov


Do science. Take pictures. Win money. Enter our photo contest here.


Related C&EN Content:

Peering Inside An Exploding Battery

Polar bear hair inspires stealth fabric

Taking 2-D materials’ temperature at the nanoscale

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Comments
Hanna (November 11, 2018 5:39 PM)
I'm sorry, it's not thermal camera, it's photoshopped image.
The author didn't explained what device he actually used.
And co-called thermal image contains 2 strange things:
- hot acetone vapor must be visible at the start of condenser tube (it cool not so fast)
- why glare on glass the receiving flask so warm?

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment