ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Environment

Better security urged for LNG plants

January 8, 2007 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 85, ISSUE 2

Following a break-in at a Massachusetts liquid natural gas (LNG) storage plant, the Department of Transportation is calling on U.S. LNG facility owners and operators to reexamine their compliance with security regulations. Last August, two people cut through two fences and a locked gate; entered the Lynn, Mass., KeySpan LNG storage facility; and climbed on top of a 12,000-gal supercooled storage tank. The incident went unnoticed for five days, despite routine perimeter inspections and a system to monitor intrusions. The break-in was recorded on tape but was ignored, as were the cut fences. The plant has been fined $250,000 by the state. KeySpan operates nine other LNG storage facilities in Massachusetts, which is also home to a terminal to receive LNG imports from abroad. The security concerns come at a time when high natural gas prices have encouraged many companies to propose new projects to increase LNG imports to the U.S. According to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the U.S. has five operating LNG terminals, but another 65 are proposed to serve the U. S. market. Inadequate security and fear of explosions are among concerns often raised at public hearings on the projects (C&EN, April 25, 2005, page 19).

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment