Covalent Conducting Belts | October 13, 2008 Issue - Vol. 86 Issue 41 | Chemical & Engineering News
Volume 86 Issue 41 | p. 29 | Concentrates
Issue Date: October 13, 2008

Covalent Conducting Belts

Department: Science & Technology

A new type of covalent organic framework (COF) assumes a belt shape and exhibits luminescence and electrical conductivity, reports a research group led by Donglin Jiang of Japan's Institute for Molecular Science (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803826). First reported last year as a general class of materials (C&EN, May 28, 2007, page 32), COFs are lightweight porous macromolecules with high surface areas that have been touted for gas storage applications. Jiang and coworkers designed a π-conjugated system of interlocking hexagons made from hydroxytriphenylene molecules (green) that occupy the vertices and pyrenediboronic acid groups that form the edges (blue). Planar sheets of the 3.2-nm-diameter hexagons layer in a perfectly eclipsed fashion, interacting through π-π stacking. The overall belt-shaped structure is 300-nm wide, 100-nm thick, and micrometers long. The authors propose that the material could be used for optoelectronic devices.

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MOLECULAR BELT
Jiang and coworkers quilted together hydroxytriphenylene (HHTP) and pyrenediboronic acid (PDBA) molecules to form a luminescent, conducting covalent organic framework.
Credit: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.
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MOLECULAR BELT
Jiang and coworkers quilted together hydroxytriphenylene (HHTP) and pyrenediboronic acid (PDBA) molecules to form a luminescent, conducting covalent organic framework.
Credit: Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.
 
 
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