ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Materials

Injectable Polymer Fixes Tissue Defects

by Lauren K. Wolf
August 1, 2011 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 89, ISSUE 31

Rather than grafting soft tissue or surgically implanting a molded polymer to fix deformities in the skin on a person’s face, doctors might in the future be able to inject a photoactivatable liquid polymer to reconstruct tissue. A research team led by Jennifer H. Elisseeff of Johns Hopkins University created a composite from methacrylated polyethylene glycol (PEG) and hyaluronic acid that, when cross-linked, forms an elastic material that mimics soft tissue (Sci. Transl. Med., DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3002331). Hyaluronic acid is a natural polysaccharide that is part of the skin’s scaffolding. The researchers showed they can inject the composite liquid under the skin of rats and humans and then initiate cross-linking of PEG’s acrylate groups with a two-minute dose of 520-nm light applied through the tissue. When used in three patients, the PEG-hyaluronic acid composites maintained their shape for the 12 weeks of the trial, but the implants induced a small inflammatory response in surrounding cells. Elisseeff says her team would like to tune the composition of the polymer mixture to reduce this response and then undertake a larger clinical trial.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment