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Materials

Microgen And Cornell Make Energy Harvester

by Michael McCoy
August 15, 2011 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 89, ISSUE 33

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Credit: MicroGen
MicroGen’s Bolt sensor is smaller than a quarter.
08933-buscon-microgencxd.jpg
Credit: MicroGen
MicroGen’s Bolt sensor is smaller than a quarter.

MicroGen Systems and Cornell University’s Cornell Nanoscale Science & Technology Facility have collaborated to develop battery-free sensors that can operate in anything that spins or shakes. The device includes a tiny sheet of piezoelectric material that generates electricity when flexed. Called Bolt, the energy-harvesting device is intended to enable low-power electronics, such as nodes for wireless sensor networks.

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