Volume 90 Issue 20 | p. 39 | Concentrates
Issue Date: May 14, 2012

Fluoropolymer Drops Graphene’s Resistance

An easily made graphene-polymer film shows promise for transparent, flexible electrodes
Department: Science & Technology
News Channels: Nano SCENE, Materials SCENE
Keywords: graphene, ferroelectric polymer, indium tin oxide, polyvinylidene fluoride, transparent electrode
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BIG BEND
A researcher bends a graphene-fluoropolymer film (inset) deposited on clear plastic.
Credit: ACS Nano
This photo shows a researcher bending a graphene-polyvinylidene-fluoride film deposited on clear plastic.
 
BIG BEND
A researcher bends a graphene-fluoropolymer film (inset) deposited on clear plastic.
Credit: ACS Nano

By laminating graphene with a fluoropolymer layer, researchers have made flexible, transparent, and highly conductive films (ACS Nano, DOI: 10.1021/nn3010137). The films could find use as the transparent electrodes needed in organic light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and video displays, the researchers say. Electronics manufacturers currently use indium tin oxide (ITO) to make transparent electrodes. But to build foldable displays and solar cells, researchers want to replace this expensive material with cheaper, more flexible graphene. One major hurdle is graphene’s relatively high electrical resistance. To increase its conductance, Barbaros Özyilmaz of the National University of Singapore and colleagues used spin-coating to add a fluorinated copolymer layer to graphene. This fluoropolymer has dipolar charges on its surface that facilitate electron transfer back and forth to graphene, decreasing graphene’s resistance from about 500 ohms to 120 ohms; ITO’s resistance is about 100 ohms. Unlike previous methods to improve graphene’s conductance, this doping method is permanent and doesn’t damage the material, Özyilmaz says.

 
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © American Chemical Society

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