ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Energy

Solar, Fossil Fuel Joined In Program

by Jeff Johnson
December 24, 2012 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 90, ISSUE 52

[+]Enlarge
Credit: Randy Montoya
These experimental concentrating solar-power collection dishes are shown at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, N.M.
09052-govcon-sandiacxd.jpg
Credit: Randy Montoya
These experimental concentrating solar-power collection dishes are shown at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, N.M.

The Department of Energy is offering $20 million in financial assistance for technologies that integrate solar and fossil-fuel energy sources. The aid would support technologies that combine new “highly disruptive” concentrating solar power technologies with existing fossil-fuel—coal or natural gas—power-generating systems that produce electricity. Through a system of mirrors or lenses, concentrating solar power systems direct sunlight to heat a medium and drive a heat engine, usually a steam turbine. DOE’s assistance would help fund R&D and deployment of hybrid technologies that combine thermal or chemical energy from a concentrating solar installation with similar thermal energy from an existing fossil-fuel plant and, using both systems, generate electricity. The department’s goal is to fund two to four of these projects with participants—industry, universities, or national laboratories—paying 75% of the cost. DOE estimates that use of this technology could add 11 to 21 gigawatts—the equivalent of 11 to 21 nuclear power plants—to existing fossil-fuel power-generating stations.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment