ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Materials

Easy Route To Conductive Nanosheets

Simple synthesis yields highly conductive nanosheets of tungsten diselenide, which is useful in many high-tech applications

by Mitch Jacoby
July 1, 2013 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 91, ISSUE 26

[+]Enlarge
Credit: Chem. Mater.
A simple solution-phase method yields high-quality nanosheets of WSe2 (W is white; Se is yellow)
09126-scicon-ChemMatercxd.jpg
Credit: Chem. Mater.
A simple solution-phase method yields high-quality nanosheets of WSe2 (W is white; Se is yellow)

The class of materials called metal dichalcogenides—which includes compounds such as MoS2, WSe2, and TaS2—finds use in numerous high-tech applications. Examples include transistors, capacitors, batteries, catalysts, and hydrogen storage materials. Nanostructured versions of these compounds can be more stable chemically and exhibit better electronic properties than their bulk counterparts. They might find even broader applications if they weren’t typically prepared via laborious methods such as sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and electrodeposition. University of Southern California chemists may have come up with an attractive solution. Priscilla D. Antunez, David H. Webber, and Richard L. Brutchey have demonstrated a simple solution-phase method to prepare highly conductive WSe2 nanosheets (Chem. Mater. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/cm400790z). The team reacted di-tert-butyl diselenide with WCl4 in dodecylamine and treated the product with a surfactant to prevent the crystallites from agglomerating. The group reports that the high-yield method produces “phase pure” samples that exhibit conductivity values typical of samples prepared by painstaking methods.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment