ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Materials

Print And Serve Nanoparticles

Researchers synthesize and pattern gold nanoparticles by depositing reactive ingredients onto a silicon surface with an ink-jet printer

by Lauren K. Wolf
January 6, 2014 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 92, ISSUE 1

[+]Enlarge
Credit: Adapted from Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.
Reactive ink-jet printing overlays two molecular inks to create an array of spots filled with gold nanoparticles.
09201-scicon-oleylamine.jpg
Credit: Adapted from Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.
Reactive ink-jet printing overlays two molecular inks to create an array of spots filled with gold nanoparticles.

To precisely position nanoparticles on the surfaces of arrayed devices such as electronic sensors and solar cells, some researchers use ink-jet printing. The nanoparticle ink typically has to be synthesized and purified in the lab first and then deposited by a printer. A research team led by Ghassan E. Jabbour of King Abdullah University of Science & Technology, in Saudi Arabia, has cut down this multistep process by printing the reactants needed to synthesize gold nanoparticles directly onto a silicon surface in the desired pattern (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013, DOI: 10.1002/anie.201308429). The researchers begin their reactive ink-jet printing process by filling two print cartridges with chemical ingredients: One contains the reducing agent oleylamine plus a solvent, and the second contains gold(III) chloride trihydrate and a solvent. The team prints picoliter droplets from the first cartridge onto a silicon wafer and then prints droplets from the second cartridge directly on top of the first layer. After three hours in a 120 °C oven, the wafer contains an array of spots filled with gold nanoparticles of uniform diameter. According to Hua Zhang, a materials scientist at Nanyang Technological University, in Singapore, this technique not only uses less material compared with synthesizing nanoparticles via a traditional process, but it also “provides an on-demand facile integration of nanoparticles into various devices.”

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment