National Science Board Warns That Pending Bill Could Damage National Science Foundation Peer Review | May 5, 2014 Issue - Vol. 92 Issue 18 | Chemical & Engineering News
Volume 92 Issue 18 | p. 9 | News of The Week
Issue Date: May 5, 2014 | Web Date: May 2, 2014

National Science Board Warns That Pending Bill Could Damage National Science Foundation Peer Review

Board says the Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science & Technology (FIRST) Act could impose significant constraints on NSF
Department: Government & Policy
Keywords: FIRST act, national science board, nsf, House science committee

The Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science & Technology (FIRST) Act (H.R. 4186) would require an NSF official to personally affirm that grant awards are in the national interest. Additionally, it would give Congress more direct control over funding for individual NSF directorates. Introduced in March, the bill is currently pending before the Science Committee.

This legislation, the science board cautions, could end up discouraging visionary grant proposals or the pursuit of transformative science.

“Some of its provisions and tone suggest that Congress intends to impose constraints that would compromise NSF’s ability to fulfill its statutory purpose,” the science board said in a statement.

The board says it is working with NSF to put in place new processes that increase transparency and accountability in its grant-making process; the changes, it contends, make the pending bill unnecessary.

However, Rep. Lamar S. Smith (R-Texas), the bill’s author and chair of the House science committee, says the new processes are too little, too late. He adds that the changes would still not require the affirmation that grants are in the national interest.

“The NSF wants to be the only federal agency to get a blank check signed by taxpayers, without having to justify how the money is spent,” Smith says.

 
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Comments
Gerald Morine (May 9, 2014 1:38 PM)
Chairman Smith's bill (HR 4186) includes language that makes pretty painless the affirmation of national interest.
"It calls for a “determination by the responsible Foundation official as to why the research grant or cooperative agreement – (1) is worthy of federal funding and (2) is in the national interest, as indicated by having the potential to achieve” one of several objectives, including, notably “promotion of the progress of science in the United States.'"
http://www.aip.org/fyi/2014/overview-hr-4186-frontiers-innovation-research-science-and-technology-act

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