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Environment

Clarity On Stereocomplexes

January 5, 2015 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 93, ISSUE 1

Nov. 17, 2014, page 21: The Environmental & Marine Project Management Agency is not part of Germany’s Jacobs University. Rather, it manages the Micro B3 marine biotechnology project for Jacobs University.

I read with interest the article concerning the work of the Geoffrey W. Coates group in preparing poly(propylene succinate) stereocomplexes (C&EN, Nov. 17, 2014, page 5). As part of a department known for our work on plastics materials, design, and processing, I’m always excited to see polymer chemists coming up with new and interesting materials that we may eventually get to work with.

That said, I would like to offer one correction to a statement made in the article that the poly(propylene succinate) stereocomplex identified was “the first known example for a polyester.” Stereocomplexes based on poly(lactic acid), the well-known biodegradable polyester, have been studied for more than a decade, and their commercialization is well under way.

While this should in no way detract from the work Coates and colleagues have done, it’s important to get this right.

Daniel Schmidt
Lowell, Mass.

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