ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Biological Chemistry

Mitochondrial Ribosome Structures Captured

Studies unveil detailed structures of complete human and pig mitoribosomes

by Stu Borman
April 6, 2015 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 93, ISSUE 14

Two research groups have obtained the first structures of complete mitoribosomes, ribosomes from mammalian mitochondria, at near-atomic resolution. Ribosomes translate genetically transcribed mRNA templates to synthesize cellular proteins. Most mammalian ribosomes are found in the cell cytoplasm. But mitochondria, the energy-producing organelles of cells, have their own ribosomes. Researchers had previously structurally analyzed the larger of the mitoribosome’s two subunits. Now, some of the same researchers have obtained structures of the complete complex. Venki Ramakrishnan and coworkers at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, in Cambridge, England, determined the structure of the human mitoribosome, including 80 proteins and three ribosomal RNAs, at 3.5-Å resolution (Science 2015, DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa1193). And Nenad Ban of ETH Zurich and coworkers determined the 3.8-Å structure of the pig mitoribosome with an mRNA and two tRNAs bound (Science 2015, DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa3872). The structures may help scientists improve antibiotics that target the bacterial ribosome but that have severe side effects, in part because they also interact with the human mitoribosome.

[+]Enlarge
Credit: Courtesy of Alan Brown
Cryoelectron microscopy structure of the human mitoribosome shows the complex’s large and small subunits. Colors denote individual proteins and RNAs in the complex.
09314-scicon-mitoribosomecxd-690.jpg
Credit: Courtesy of Alan Brown
Cryoelectron microscopy structure of the human mitoribosome shows the complex’s large and small subunits. Colors denote individual proteins and RNAs in the complex.
X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment