ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Pharmaceuticals

‘Capsosomes’ To Treat Phenylketonuria

Drug Delivery: Liposomes buried within a polymeric carrier deliver enzymes to break down phenylalanine and avoid its toxic effects

by Jyllian Kemsley
June 8, 2015 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 93, ISSUE 23

[+]Enlarge
Credit: Adv. Funct. Mater.
Liposomes (green) containing phenylalanine ammonia lyase are layered on a silica particle (pink) and coated with a polymer (gray), enabling delivery of the enzymes to convert phenylalanine to trans-cinnamic acid.
09323-scicon-capocombo-690.jpg
Credit: Adv. Funct. Mater.
Liposomes (green) containing phenylalanine ammonia lyase are layered on a silica particle (pink) and coated with a polymer (gray), enabling delivery of the enzymes to convert phenylalanine to trans-cinnamic acid.

Replacing defective enzymes is a promising treatment for many diseases, but in practice it is difficult to achieve because enzymes are readily degraded in the digestive tract or bloodstream. Encasing enzymes in liposomes that are layered on a silica particle and then coated with a polymer to create a “capsosome” is a new approach that could help with the delivery, reports a group led by Leticia Hosta-Rigau and Brigitte Städler of Denmark’s Aarhus University (Adv. Funct. Mater. 2015, DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201404180). The researchers think the technology could be used for controlling phenylketonuria, a condition involving a genetic defect that disables a liver enzyme that metabolizes phenylalanine into tyrosine. The consequent buildup of phenylalanine causes brain damage, and the only treatment is dietary control to limit phenylalanine consumption. Hosta-Rigau, Städler, and colleagues loaded their capsosomes with phenylalanine ammonia lyase, an enzyme that converts phenylalanine to nontoxic trans-cinnamic acid. They tested the delivery system in microfluidic devices that allowed them to simulate flow over human intestinal cells. The capsosomes successfully converted phenylalanine to trans-cinnamic acid while staying outside the cells and showing no sign of cytotoxicity.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment