ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Policy

U.S. R&D Support Rises In 2013

by Andrea Widener
September 28, 2015 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 93, ISSUE 38

Spending on R&D in the U.S. rose to an all-time high of $453 billion in 2013, up $21 billion from 2012, according to a new NSF report. This comes after almost flat spending in this area during the years immediately after the 2008 recession. Most of the increase comes from improved R&D spending by businesses, while federal funding has been flat or even declined, the report says. Businesses continue to be the largest source of R&D funds in the U.S. at 65%, or $297 billion, followed by the federal government with 27%, or $122 billion. Colleges and universities, nonprofits, and state and local governments round out the supporters of U.S. R&D. The vast majority of this spending went to development of products at $285 billion, or 63%. Basic research received $81 billion, or 18% of the funding, and applied research $91 billion, or 20%. The amount of R&D spending compared with the U.S. gross domestic product—also called R&D intensity—rose to 2.72%, which remains lower than the peak of 2.81% in 2009.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment