ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Materials

Coating plus doping improves performance of promising material for lithium-ion batteries

Treating cathode compound with iron via atomic layer deposition boosts capacity and extends lifetime

by Mitch Jacoby
May 16, 2016 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 94, ISSUE 20

[+]Enlarge
Credit: Sci. Rep.
Not only does ALD coat the surface of a Li-ion battery cathode particle with an ultrathin iron oxide film (left), it also causes iron ions (orange) to penetrate the cathode particle (right), thereby improving battery performance.
Credit: Sci. Rep.
Not only does ALD coat the surface of a Li-ion battery cathode particle with an ultrathin iron oxide film (left), it also causes iron ions (orange) to penetrate the cathode particle (right), thereby improving battery performance.

Atomic layer deposition (ALD), a well-studied layer-by-layer method for depositing thin films on solids, is prized for its ability to form ultrathin films that conform perfectly to oddly shaped and tough-to-coat solid surfaces. A study finds that not only does ALD coat materials with a film-forming compound, but also it can penetrate the solid, doping the material. This combination of coating and doping can improve lithium-ion battery materials (Sci. Rep. 2016, DOI: 10.1038/srep25293).

LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (LMNO) has drawn significant attention as a candidate Li-ion battery cathode material because of its low cost, high theoretical charge capacity, and high operating voltage relative to other commonly studied cathode materials, including LiMn2O4, which has been used in plug-in hybrid electric vehicle batteries. In practice, however, unwanted electrochemical reactions cause LMNO’s charge capacity to diminish quickly.

A team led by Xinhua Liang of Missouri University of Science & Technology reasoned that treating LMNO with iron oxide, an electrochemically active compound, via high-temperature ALD would coat and dope LMNO and improve its properties. It worked.

Compared with naked LMNO, the ALD-treated samples exhibited 25% higher charge capacity and retained roughly 93% of their capacity even after 1,000 charging cycles.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment