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Environment

Re: Vanilla extract

September 26, 2016 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 94, ISSUE 38

Melody Bomgardner’s cover story “The Problem with Vanilla” (C&EN, Sept. 12, page 38) left an online reader contemplating the value of natural vanilla.

I see merit in the argument that true vanilla extracts have subtle flavor differences worth highlighting in food. ... Harder for a chemist (like me) to argue the true extracts are worthwhile when the food is so processed you can’t tell the difference ... And yet, confession: I almost always buy the true extract anyway, in part because it’s not (yet) ridiculously expensive.

Jake Yeston (@JakeYeston) via Twitter


Corrections

Aug. 15/22, page 19: A Policy Concentrate incorrectly identified David Allen’s position at the University of Texas, Austin. He is a chemical engineering professor, not a chemistry professor.

Aug. 15/22, page 24: A feature story on tattoo ink incorrectly attributed statistics to the Joint Research Council. The statistics should have been attributed to the Joint Research Centre.

Aug. 29, page 6: A Science Concentrate about an improved synthetic route to ryanodol incorrectly stated that Pierre Deslongchamps’s group at the University of Sherbrooke first reported a synthesis of ryanodol in 1990. The synthesis was actually first reported in 1979 (Can. J. Chem., DOI: 10.1139/v79-547). The full paper on the synthesis was published in 1990.

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