ADVERTISEMENT
2 /3 FREE ARTICLES LEFT THIS MONTH Remaining
Chemistry matters. Join us to get the news you need.

If you have an ACS member number, please enter it here so we can link this account to your membership. (optional)

ACS values your privacy. By submitting your information, you are gaining access to C&EN and subscribing to our weekly newsletter. We use the information you provide to make your reading experience better, and we will never sell your data to third party members.

ENJOY UNLIMITED ACCES TO C&EN

Pharmaceuticals

Method determines plausible forms of ancestral blood clotting protein

Resurrected sequences have better pharmaceutical properties than modern human factor VIII

by Celia Henry Arnaud
October 3, 2016 | APPEARED IN VOLUME 94, ISSUE 39

[+]Enlarge
Credit: Philip Zakas
Ancestral sequence reconstruction predicts how human coagulation factor VIII (gray) differs from its ancestors (colored regions).
Credit: Philip Zakas
Ancestral sequence reconstruction predicts how human coagulation factor VIII (gray) differs from its ancestors (colored regions).

Ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) is a computational method in which the sequences of closely related proteins from different species are used to infer ancient protein sequences within a predicted evolutionary tree. Christopher B. Doering of Emory University, Eric A. Gaucher of Georgia Tech, and coworkers have used ASR to improve the pharmaceutical properties of coagulation factor VIII, a protein essential to blood clotting (Nat. Biotechnol. 2016, DOI: 10.1038/nbt.3677). Deficiency in factor VIII is the cause of hemophilia A, and infusion of the protein is used to treat the disease. Unfortunately, many people who receive therapeutic factor VIII develop antibodies to it. Plus, recombinant human factor VIII is hard to produce in cell culture manufacturing systems. By using ASR, Doering and coworkers constructed a family tree of factor VIII ancestors from which they selected 14 proteins for evaluation. Several of these ancestral proteins were produced more efficiently, were more potent, were less immune-reactive, and remained active longer than modern human factor VIII. Doering’s group is now working with the ancestral sequences as potential gene therapy agents, as well as extending the general ASR approach to other pharmaceutically relevant blood coagulation factors.

X

Article:

This article has been sent to the following recipient:

Leave A Comment

*Required to comment